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Unconventional Training Club

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Ľudovít Leško
Ľudovít Leško

Bonecraft Proper Crack Reloaded 223


Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223: A Guide to Reloading the .223 Remington Cartridge




The .223 Remington is one of the most popular and versatile cartridges in the world. It is used for a variety of purposes, such as varmint and predator hunting, target shooting, military and law enforcement applications, and even self-defense. However, if you want to get the most out of your .223 Remington, you might want to consider reloading your own ammunition. Reloading can save you money, improve your accuracy, and allow you to customize your loads to suit your needs and preferences. In this article, we will show you how to reload the .223 Remington cartridge using the Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223 method.


What is Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223?




Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223 is a reloading technique that involves using bone ash as a filler material in your cases. Bone ash is a fine powder that is made from burning animal bones. It has several benefits for reloading, such as:




bonecraft proper crack reloaded 223




  • It reduces the case capacity, which increases the pressure and velocity of your loads.



  • It acts as a buffer between the powder and the bullet, which reduces the erosion of the barrel and the throat.



  • It stabilizes the combustion of the powder, which improves the consistency and accuracy of your loads.



  • It adds weight to your cases, which helps with feeding and extraction in semi-automatic rifles.




Bone ash can be obtained from various sources, such as butcher shops, pet stores, or online retailers. You can also make your own bone ash by burning animal bones in a fire or an oven. However, you need to make sure that the bone ash is finely ground and free of any impurities or moisture. You can use a coffee grinder or a mortar and pestle to grind the bone ash into a fine powder.


How to Reload the .223 Remington with Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223?




Reloading the .223 Remington with Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223 is similar to reloading any other cartridge, with some minor differences. Here are the steps you need to follow:



  • Sort your cases by headstamp and inspect them for any defects or damage. Discard any cases that are cracked, split, dented, or have loose primer pockets.



  • Clean your cases using a tumbler, an ultrasonic cleaner, or a case cleaner solution. Make sure that your cases are dry before proceeding to the next step.



  • Resize your cases using a small base resizing die or a full length resizing die. This will ensure that your cases fit properly in your chamber and feed reliably in your rifle. If you are using a bolt action rifle, you can use a neck sizing die instead, which will preserve the fire-formed shape of your cases and improve your accuracy.



  • Trim your cases to the correct length using a case trimmer or a case gauge. The maximum case length for the .223 Remington is 1.760 inches, but you can trim them slightly shorter for convenience. You can also chamfer and deburr the case mouths to remove any burrs or sharp edges.



  • Prime your cases using a hand priming tool or a press-mounted priming tool. Use small rifle primers that are suitable for your powder choice and your rifle type. For example, if you are using military surplus powder or shooting in an AR-15 rifle, you might want to use military-spec primers that have harder cups and are more resistant to slam fires.



  • Powder charge your cases using a powder measure or a scale. Choose a powder that is appropriate for your bullet weight and your rifle type. For example, if you are loading light bullets for varmint hunting, you might want to use a fast-burning powder like H322 or Benchmark. If you are loading heavy bullets for long-range shooting, you might want to use a slow-burning powder like Varget or IMR 4895. Consult a reliable reloading manual or online database for recommended powder charges and start with the minimum load and work up gradually until you find the optimal load for your rifle.



  • Add bone ash to your cases using a funnel or a spoon. The amount of bone ash you need to add depends on your case capacity and your powder charge. A general rule of thumb is to fill the remaining space in your case with bone ash, leaving a slight gap between the bone ash and the bullet base. You can also use a case gauge or a caliper to measure the depth of the bone ash in your case. The ideal depth is between 0.1 and 0.2 inches.



  • Bullet seat your cases using a bullet seating die or a seating stem. Choose a bullet that matches your rifle's twist rate and your intended purpose. For example, if you have a 1:12-inch twist rate, you might want to use bullets that weigh between 40 and 55 grains. If you have a 1:7-inch twist rate, you might want to use bullets that weigh between 69 and 77 grains. Consult a reliable reloading manual or online database for recommended bullet seating depths and overall cartridge lengths. Make sure that your cartridges fit in your magazine and chamber smoothly.



  • Crimp your cases using a crimping die or a factory crimp die. This will secure the bullet in place and prevent it from moving during feeding and firing. Crimping is especially important for semi-automatic rifles, as they generate more recoil and chamber pressure than bolt action rifles. However, you should avoid over-crimping your cases, as this can deform the bullet and reduce your accuracy.




How to Test Your Reloads?




Before you shoot your reloads, you should inspect them for any defects or inconsistencies. Check the primer seating, the powder charge, the bone ash depth, the bullet seating, and the crimping. Discard any cartridges that are faulty or suspicious.


When you shoot your reloads, you should start with a low charge and work up gradually until you reach the maximum load or the best accuracy. You should also chronograph your reloads to measure their velocity and standard deviation. This will help you evaluate their performance and consistency.


You should also check your brass for any signs of excessive pressure or wear. Look for flattened or cratered primers, shiny marks on the case head, split necks, or loose primer pockets. If you see any of these signs, you should reduce your powder charge or stop shooting your reloads altogether.


Conclusion




Reloading the .223 Remington with Bonecraft Proper Reloaded 223 is a fun and rewarding hobby that can enhance your shooting experience. By using bone ash as a filler material, you can increase the pressure and velocity of your loads, reduce the barrel erosion and throat wear, improve the consistency and accuracy of your loads, and help with feeding and extraction in semi-automatic rifles. However, you need to be careful and follow the proper reloading procedures and safety precautions. Always use reliable data sources, start with low charges, work up gradually, test your reloads, and inspect your brass. Happy reloading!


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